The installer completed the job yesterday and we were told that we could walk on it today. I have talked to a few of my friends about this and they all were under the impression that grout should be sealed. Is it going to damage the floors in the long run if we do not seal the grout? Just find out from your installer which type of grout was used and whether he used an additive that would make the grout stain resistant.

I have seen more than one tile contractor roll their eyes at the sealing the grout issue. I have had two different renters (families with young children) in that home. I was not concerned with the shade of grout or tile varying slightly. Sealing grout is often an overlooked detail when your contractor is selling you the project. Flooring contractors exclude sealing because it requires a return trip well after the installation is complete and it is a time intensive process. Two photos attached show case-in-point recent tile projects that no one wants to seal by hand.

He recommends tinting your grout close to your tile colour so that soiled grout is not as obvious, if that is your concern. He doesn’t just do his work “to code”, he goes beyond that to make sure a job doesn’t have to be redone. Holmes should not push his celebrity weight around and go against manufactures recommendations for a maintenance friendly tile job. I can honestly say that there is no such thing ( to this date ) as sealer offering waterproofing, let alone water resistance to grout. Long story short, if you really feel that it is necessary to seal grout, then use a high quality brand and expect to re-apply every 12 months. My builder says an additive was added to the grout to help with mildew, but the shower floor needs constant scrubbing to avoid mildew (like every few days), the rest of the grout in the shower is fine. I personally use ceramictilepro grout cleaner which safe and odor free. Bond solves grout cracking issues at all corners and works way better that caulk/silicone. She said the browning is because of the surface area of the grout to pebbles and the fact that some water does remain on the floor even properly sloped and short of towel drying the floor after every shower, it’ll probably continue to occur. She agrees that the builder should have made people aware of this before taking the “upgrade” that was included in the price (this builder bases their price on the model home features which included some upgrades, and then any other upgrades you want get added, or any you don’t want get subtracted from the model price).



How To Seal Stone Tile And Grout In 10 Minutes (Quick Tips) | Duration 2 Minutes 9 Seconds

If it has to be torn up anyway because of their mistake with the grout, we can switch to tile. If you do decide to install tile, porcelain tiles 2×2 work really well and is my preferred choice. That rule also works great on acrylic showers and glass doors and as an added bonus – to get your teenagers to be the first out of bed in the morning.

He said that it’ll actually be easier than trying to repair what needs to be repaired. It’s an off white color and there are areas now that are brownish color. If it’s had a sealer applied, will a cleaner get underneath to actually clean?

I asked him if we should seal the grout and he told me no- that it is not necessary. There are many high performance grouts like epoxy or urethane that do not need sealing. A simple test is to place a few droplets of water on the grout if it absorbs the drops you need to seal. Because yes it is likely he didn’t quote it in the price because he thinks “it will be fine”. Plus they’re suitable for any ceramic or stone tile on floors or walls, can accommodate 1/16″ to 1/2″ joint widths, and come in up to 35 colours.

Although this is an old thread it will always be a current issue, so here’s my position. It is important to realize as a consumer that generally your new tile installation does not include sealing the grout. For a larger job, with say a wood-simulated ceramic plank, the grout lines are extensive and to further complicate the process, the grout lines are staggered so as to emphasize the wood-simulation.

Staggered grout lines don’t permit you to quickly run through the lines with a sealing bottle. A little money spent up front pays dividends with 1) no return trip, 2) no labor cost to seal all those grout lines, 3) a happy customer with a beautiful new floor that is impervious to spills. If you seal your grout and water somehow does get behind or under tiles, it’s stuck there. Sealing grout can lead to sealing in moisture which can lead to bigger problems. Some proper tile installations requires sealing of grout and the tiles themselves. I have heard them say that if they only sealed their grout, the shower wouldn’t have leaked. Simply read the front/rear labels on grout sealers and you will see for yourself.

It is 99% waterproof, will not crack and never needs sealing. Grout additives that suggest the elimination of future sealing are more of a gimmick in my opinion and i don’t use them as a tile contractor. If so, that is very common, especially if caulk/silicone was used but can also form with regular grout. If this is in your kitchen sealant would help your backsplash grout from getting grease and other cooking stains. She thinks that had we done regular tiles on the floor, we would not of had this issue (and we haven’t on any of the tiles, so maybe she’s right).



How To Seal Tile And Grout | Duration 14 Minutes 31 Seconds

Will they be tiling directly over your existing floor or removing tile only, or may be completely removing the entire shower floor?

All showers would stay like new much much longer if the last person to use the shower in the morning toweled off the walls and the floor just to get rid of the excess water. The guy’s recommendation is that they rip out the existing floor and start over. We squeegee the shower door already, we’ll start drying off the floor too. Looking forward to trying it (after they redo my floor – they are ripping out the stones next week and replacing with 2×2 tiles).

Do I Need To Seal My Porcelain Tile and Grout? by ctasc.com

Also to see which product would be best and what you would recommend. If you do have a glazed porcelain tile then you have an impervious glass-like coating over the surface of the porcelain tile body and it is even more stain resistant. I do like to apply certain sealers over glazed tiles and cementitious grout mainly because it provides a coating on the tile and grout that will help keep some substances from readily sticking to it; so the tile doesn’t tend to pick up dirt and it is easier to clean and keep clean. Depending on its exposure to foot traffic and frequency of cleaning it can wear. All you probably need is a 32 oz bottle depending on how many square feet of tile you have. Put more on the grout than the tile, since the grout will absorb the sealer. Once the cloth is damp with sealer you can just spray the sealer over the grout joints and when you wipe up the excess with the cloth you can apply it to other adjacent tiles my simply wiping it over their surfaces. It is important not to leave any excess sealer on the tile surface because it won’t get absorbed and it can leave a sticky surface that can become a maintenance problem. There are versions of penetrating sealers that are enhancers that give the tile more of a wet look. The problem is you applied the sealer too heavy of an application and/or you did not buff it dry with a lint free cloth right after you apply the sealer.

Let it stand on the tile for maybe 5 minutes or less, and then before it dries buff the floor dry with a dry lint free cloth. There is no practical way to make the glazed tile more shinny unless you apply a wax and buff the floor which creates a lot of maintenance work. Unglazed porcelain tiles can be polished like a natural granite, but you would need to hire a professional stone restoration company to do that work. Is this primarily due to the darker color or is there something we can do to eliminate that issue? The cause and solution of your problem with the tacky finish is still the same. Polished tiles have a sheen, so if you don’t have a sheen, then you don’t have a polished tile.

Since the porcelain tile is impervious, spray the sealer on and wipe with a lint free cloth make sure it is applied evenly and to absorb any residual sealer.



Sealing Marble Tile | Duration 3 Minutes 36 Seconds

Since only the grout will absorb it, you want to buff dry the surface of the tile with a dry lint free cloth right after you apply the sealer.

We thought we should check with you first to see if you think the price is reasonable or if we could get a better price elsewhere. It will get darker over time whether you seal it or not, but it will be easier to clean and will less likely stain if you do seal it.

Porcelain is a type of ceramic tile that is impervious, which means its absorption is ½ of 1 percent or less.

Although some unglazed porcelain tiles can have microscopic out-gassing voids that can possibly trap stains of certain products if they are not cleaned up readily or properly. So it is only the grout that can have a propensity to stain depending on the conditions it is subjected to. The test for determining that it is still working is that when you put drops of water on the tile or grout joint, the water beads up like water on wax. Since your tile is impervious you won’t need much sealer because the tile will not absorb much. If there are any stains in the grout then you will trap them in by applying the sealer over it. You can put the sealer in a plastic spray bottle and mist over the tile and grout. Once the cloth is too damp to wipe up excess sealer get another clean and dry cloth. It is a wood like effect on my terrace but not polished (glazed). Generally speaking using a penetrating sealer is best because it is a breathable sealer. I would avoid the surface type of sealers that give the tile more of glossy appearance, because they are not breathable sealers and can trap moisture in the tile that can cause certain types of staining.

You should visit those sites to help you determine what type of tile you have and which sealer is best for your situation. The tile is supposedly polished, but doesn’t look very shiny. Is there a recommended way to remove the sticky residue of this product without removing the sealer for the tile and grout completely? You are applying the sealer over an impervious tile, so it will not absorb much other than on a microscopic level.


How To Seal Grout And Tile Floor In Your Shower | Duration 5 Minutes 18 Seconds

To remove the sticky residue, apply more of the 511 sealer that will act as a solvent to loosen up the residue. Maybe you have a glazed porcelain tile if it has somewhat of a sheen. Or if the tile is in fact an unglazed porcelain tile that has been polished, maybe it only has a hone surface that gives a slight sheen. Although with an impervious unglazed porcelain tile it won’t absorb much. You have to almost immediately buff the floor dry after applying the sealer. Maybe it is honed finished with a slight sheen, or just a smooth unglazed porcelain tile finish.

You have to buff it dry with a lint free cloth and if you do it correctly it should not be tacky or leave smudges. The tile really doesn’t need the sealer because it is impervious.

Check with the manufacturer as to what they say about using it over a porcelain tile. Otherwise the sealer on the tile surface can become sticky and cause a problem.

Seal Your Tiles Not Your Grout by theglobeandmail.com

Or they’ve been living in a new home for a while and find the grout in the floor tile shows dirt in all the high-traffic areas. Usually, they’re told they should have sealed the grout the first time but that they can apply a sealer now.

A lot of the time, your own contractor doesn’t know the right answer.

Sealer soaks into the grout and supposedly makes your tile and grout waterproof. So, if your grout is sealed, how will that water evaporate back out? If your grout is driving you crazy because you can’t keep it clean, it’s not a big deal to remove it and replace it with a darker-coloured grout that won’t show the dirt. If you don’t, the grout will be absorbed into the tile, ruining the finish.

So, you can’t let your contractor tile, grout, then seal the whole thing – it would be a huge mistake. In an older bathroom, there likely are cracks in the grout that allow in even more moisture. That’s like using a wad of chewing gum to plug a hole in your boat. If your bathroom is older and a fully waterproof membrane wasn’t installed behind the tiles, water has been getting in for years. Remove the tiles, and investigate the condition of the subfloor and structure. Don’t do half the job to save some money, then try to seal the grout hoping to keep water out.

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When they get to the tiling stage of their bathroom or kitchen renovation they get stuck. So a lot of people think a clear sealer will make grout more resistant to moisture and make it easier to clean. People who want to sell you grout sealer will tell you it keeps it easier to clean, and helps prevent mildew from growing. In my opinion, grout needs to be able to breathe, so that any moisture that gets in behind your tile is able to escape.

No matter what, moisture – steam and water – eventually will get through the grout, or through a crack in your tile. Just chisel it out carefully – it’s tedious, but just requires some elbow grease. If that happens, it’s impossible to get the grout out of the pores of the tile. Some of this water will evaporate throughout the day, but some will penetrate behind the wall – leading to mould, mildew and rotting of the structure. You need to make sure you go all the way and waterproof properly.

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Do I Need To Seal My Grout? by houzz.com

The installer completed the job yesterday and we were told that we could walk on it today. I have talked to a few of my friends about this and they all were under the impression that grout should be sealed. Is it going to damage the floors in the long run if we do not seal the grout? Just find out from your installer which type of grout was used and whether he used an additive that would make the grout stain resistant. I have seen more than one tile contractor roll their eyes at the sealing the grout issue. I have had two different renters (families with young children) in that home.

I was not concerned with the shade of grout or tile varying slightly. Sealing grout is often an overlooked detail when your contractor is selling you the project.

Flooring contractors exclude sealing because it requires a return trip well after the installation is complete and it is a time intensive process. Two photos attached show case-in-point recent tile projects that no one wants to seal by hand. He recommends tinting your grout close to your tile colour so that soiled grout is not as obvious, if that is your concern. He doesn’t just do his work “to code”, he goes beyond that to make sure a job doesn’t have to be redone. Holmes should not push his celebrity weight around and go against manufactures recommendations for a maintenance friendly tile job. I can honestly say that there is no such thing ( to this date ) as sealer offering waterproofing, let alone water resistance to grout.

Long story short, if you really feel that it is necessary to seal grout, then use a high quality brand and expect to re-apply every 12 months. My builder says an additive was added to the grout to help with mildew, but the shower floor needs constant scrubbing to avoid mildew (like every few days), the rest of the grout in the shower is fine.

I personally use ceramictilepro grout cleaner which safe and odor free. Bond solves grout cracking issues at all corners and works way better that caulk/silicone. She said the browning is because of the surface area of the grout to pebbles and the fact that some water does remain on the floor even properly sloped and short of towel drying the floor after every shower, it’ll probably continue to occur. She agrees that the builder should have made people aware of this before taking the “upgrade” that was included in the price (this builder bases their price on the model home features which included some upgrades, and then any other upgrades you want get added, or any you don’t want get subtracted from the model price). If it has to be torn up anyway because of their mistake with the grout, we can switch to tile. If you do decide to install tile, porcelain tiles 2×2 work really well and is my preferred choice. That rule also works great on acrylic showers and glass doors and as an added bonus – to get your teenagers to be the first out of bed in the morning. He said that it’ll actually be easier than trying to repair what needs to be repaired. It’s an off white color and there are areas now that are brownish color. If it’s had a sealer applied, will a cleaner get underneath to actually clean?

I asked him if we should seal the grout and he told me no- that it is not necessary.

There are many high performance grouts like epoxy or urethane that do not need sealing. A simple test is to place a few droplets of water on the grout if it absorbs the drops you need to seal. Because yes it is likely he didn’t quote it in the price because he thinks “it will be fine”. Plus they’re suitable for any ceramic or stone tile on floors or walls, can accommodate 1/16″ to 1/2″ joint widths, and come in up to 35 colours. Although this is an old thread it will always be a current issue, so here’s my position. It is important to realize as a consumer that generally your new tile installation does not include sealing the grout. For a larger job, with say a wood-simulated ceramic plank, the grout lines are extensive and to further complicate the process, the grout lines are staggered so as to emphasize the wood-simulation. Staggered grout lines don’t permit you to quickly run through the lines with a sealing bottle. A little money spent up front pays dividends with 1) no return trip, 2) no labor cost to seal all those grout lines, 3) a happy customer with a beautiful new floor that is impervious to spills. If you seal your grout and water somehow does get behind or under tiles, it’s stuck there.

Sealing grout can lead to sealing in moisture which can lead to bigger problems.

Some proper tile installations requires sealing of grout and the tiles themselves. I have heard them say that if they only sealed their grout, the shower wouldn’t have leaked. Simply read the front/rear labels on grout sealers and you will see for yourself. It is 99% waterproof, will not crack and never needs sealing.

Grout additives that suggest the elimination of future sealing are more of a gimmick in my opinion and i don’t use them as a tile contractor. If so, that is very common, especially if caulk/silicone was used but can also form with regular grout. If this is in your kitchen sealant would help your backsplash grout from getting grease and other cooking stains. She thinks that had we done regular tiles on the floor, we would not of had this issue (and we haven’t on any of the tiles, so maybe she’s right). Will they be tiling directly over your existing floor or removing tile only, or may be completely removing the entire shower floor?

All showers would stay like new much much longer if the last person to use the shower in the morning toweled off the walls and the floor just to get rid of the excess water. The guy’s recommendation is that they rip out the existing floor and start over. We squeegee the shower door already, we’ll start drying off the floor too. Looking forward to trying it (after they redo my floor – they are ripping out the stones next week and replacing with 2×2 tiles).

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