This product can be applied to any laminate or hardwood countertop in reasonable condition. After using this product, we can report that it’s surprisingly easy to apply.

We can’t speak to its longterm durability, but when we tried to scratch the newly resurfaced countertop with car keys, it was surprisingly tough—no marks at all. Vacuum up the dust and wipe all surfaces with a damp cloth until they’re completely dust-free. Once you’ve applied the base coat, you’ll have a 20-minute window to apply the decorative chips before it dries.Apply the base coat thickly using a brush on the backsplash and a microfiber roller (not included in the kit) on the flat surface and front edge.

You really need to lay it on thickly and evenly and maintain a wet edge on the entire surface for the best result. The kit comes with a ton of chips, so use more than you need to cover every bit of the base coat. Then use the chip scraper to knock down the rough chip edges. The kit includes a sample of how smooth the countertop should be. Use the sanding block and a lighter touch on the backsplash and front edges since these areas are likely to have fewer chips on the surface, and sand harder on the flat surfaces.


Resurfacing Laminate Kitchen Countertops | Diy Kitchen Ideas | Kitchen Designs | Duration 25 Seconds

Make a very light last pass with 120-grit sandpaper for extra smoothness. Let dry to the touch (four to six hours) and remove the tape and plastic. Burns and scratches are fine, but fill deep dents and chips before you use it. And you can reapply the system to renew the surface later if you want. Use painter’s tape and plastic to mask off base cabinets, the sink, appliances, the walls above the backsplash and the floor. If you have a long countertop or several countertop areas, work in pairs and complete one section (including the chip application) before moving on to the next. Use a light touch so you don’t gouge the surface at the corners and edges. Sand the rough chip surfaces smooth to prepare them for the topcoat. The challenge is to sand it smooth without sanding through the chips. The sanding process will appear to lighten the chip surface, but the topcoat will darken it again. Vacuum and wipe clean with a damp cloth until all the sanding dust has been removed.

Once you’ve mixed the formula, you must use it within four hours. Just as you did with the base coat, use a paintbrush to apply a thick layer of topcoat to the backsplash and back few inches of the countertop. Once every surface is covered, go back and roll a final pass of the topcoat in one direction to avoid lap and brush marks. The countertop will be ready for light use in 48 hours and completely cured within a week.

How To Renovate A Bathroom by thisoldhouse.com

Check recent references for plumbers and other pros you hire. So before you start tearing up the tiles and picking out the tub, get a little advice from the people who make bathroom makeovers their bread and butter. But for comfort’s sake, look for an area that’s 3 to 4 feet wide and 6 to 8 feet long. Replace the wiring too, with a dedicated 20-amp circuit and plenty of outlets for all the appliances you use, from electric razors and toothbrushes to hair-straightening irons. If you can, mark potential spots with painter’s tape first, then adjust for comfort. Size it to minimize tile cuts, and line the bottom with a leftover piece of stone or solid-surface countertop, not tile, so that you won’t have to scrape away scum from grout lines. But the work surface has less usable space and is tougher to keep clean. An average 30-inch vanity has nearly 15 cubic feet of storage (minus the sink bowl and pipes) and about 10 inches of countertop on each side.

Try to see fixtures in action before you buy to make sure the amount and quality of light is sufficient. It can take as long as 45 minutes to warm up, so put it on a programmable thermostat to chase away the chill by the time your alarm clock goes off. Grab bars should be secured to blocking between wall studs and placed 33 to 36 inches off the floor. If you’re not pouring a new floor, mortar and screw ¼-inch backerboard over a level subfloor, then lay tile on top. Make sure it has enough power for back-to-back showers, and put it on a timer so that you can let it run for 20 minutes to banish steam after you’re done. Or, spend a bit more for one with a humidity sensor so that you don’t have to rely on kids or guests to turn it on. Opt for one with a built-in light, or wire it to a light switch so that it will turn on automatically. Arrange your bathroom so that there are no fixtures, and therefore no plumbing, on exterior walls. Run pipes in the wall on the interior side of the insulation. Buy plenty of plastic sheeting to contain dust if you’re knocking out tile and drywall yourself. Unless sealed vigilantly, they’ll absorb drips and spills and become stained over time. Another option: small tiles with lots of grout lines, which offer better “grip” than large tiles. And make sure it contains a mildewcide that offers protection for five years or longer. Theoretically, you can fit a sink and toilet into an 11-square-foot spot and still meet national building codes. Decide where to put things early on so that you can add extra blocking where needed before finishing the walls. If you have kids, add an extra cubby around knee height so that they can suds up on their own. You’ll need sufficient clearance to open cabinet doors or pull out drawers. If there’s no room for side sconces, install a long fixture on the wall above the mirror. But you don’t need to have it throughout your house; you can simply add an electric mat to boost a bath’s existing heating system. Other things to consider: a barrier-free shower, a wider doorway, and a lower sink height. Give each sink enough outlets and lighting, as well as mirror, countertop, and storage space. Bring pipes up through the floor instead of the wall if it’s a first-floor bathroom. Locate all water shutoff valves so that there are no floods when taking out fixtures. Determine whether to donate or dispose of old fixtures, and make plans accordingly.

Vintage Bathrooms My Mint and Pink Bathroom by theinspiredroom.net

I don’t have anything against those colors or even against a funky vintage bathroom, they can be very cool. At least it was nice and clean when we bought the house (for a minute). I loved the green and black combo with the natural wood blinds. That is one of the reasons it’s nice to keep the original tile. The grout is super thick in some places and hard to keep clean.The tub is cast iron so it’s not going anywhere without a fight. Try anchoring the room with some black picture frames, a tray, a black door, or hardware. A new vanity or sink could make a world of difference in the look and function of your bathroom, even if you keep everything else in the bathroom. It was always worth it, but it didn’t last forever and you did have to baby your tub to keep the finish nice.

You can scroll through the images below to shop for some bathroom accessories!

That pink and black one reminds me of the bathroom in our first home!

I did deglaze the run white (it was white originally) – hard to do much now since we only have the one bathroom- other than go on a long vacation while work is done. I would rather see the kitchen in progress or as it is than wait and wait for whatever it is you are waiting to complete!

I find the bathrooms with the black accent tile to be really striking. Would it be possible to remove the glass wall to open up the room?

Paint the room and then find a shower curtain to pull together the pink and green. That would look sharp, and it would be easy to find cute accents for those colors. I would leave the frosted glass partition, otherwise you have to take up the floor. A framed mirror and shelves and/or scones on either side of it?

Love the idea of stenciling something fun on the glass partition. Maybe add some small unframed glass shelves (which look green from the side and would reflect the green tile). Replace mirror – you have great taste as to finish and style of lights and mirror. Quite a few folks have suggested painting the pink tile only – would make a huge visual change. I would work with the mint and think of it more as “sea glass green”.Paint the pink tiles the same gray as the three accent tiles and replace the sink/vanity.

We didn’t rip these out or paint the tile or do anything to destroy their character. After a ton of cleaning, new vintage-inspired faucets and lights and a cool built-in old looking medicine cabinet, the rest stayed as is. You can’t see it but it had black soapstone counters on the vanity and a bamboo window shade. The tile in these old bathrooms aren’t at all like the tile in new bathrooms. The grout lines have been painted over with some sort of grout renew.

We have another bathroom downstairs that our son uses, so if we put in a main floor guest bath this mint bathroom could become a private master bathroom. I could just leave the tile and tub as is and add accessories. But they could be inspiration for how to update a vintage bathroom without losing all the charm. Adding some black accents can add some seriousness and class to a otherwise more cotton candy color scheme. Try simplifying the color scheme with fresh white walls, towels, rugs or a shower curtain. The vanity is one of the biggest style setters in a bathroom. What are some other updates that could transform the space?

But if your bathroom has a dingy old tub or sink or ugly tile, it can probably get a shiny new surface that will make it so much easier to clean, too. The short vanity would annoy me, too, so that’d be at the top of my list to replace. I would replace the vanity and resurface the tub and remaining tile. I actually like the colors but still am looking for a way to update it. They are cute in vintage homes, but by the 50s they were becoming passe’. I think it could be a very romantic retro bathroom that would make you smile. Can you paint the pink tiles black and the tub white?

You could find an amazing fabric to pull it all together and make a simple roman shade with it. And replace the vanity – tiny non-functional drawers are a deal breaker for me. Much more cost effective and will completely change the look!

A new white surface for the tub and black accents where the pink is would go a long way towards making this bathroom spiffy again. But a green and white bath mat for bathtime only would be perfect. I hope refinishing the tub and painting over the pink tile would fit in the budget now, and the rest you can do gradually. Resurface tub and paint the pink tile only (you could use black or stick with green). Rug on the floor will draw the eye away from the floor tile.

We kept the vintage green tile around the cast iron tub and it’s lovely. That would be a great spot to hang a picture on both sides of the wall. It’s in such great shape overall, it seems a shame to pull everything apart!

I have the exact same tub, along with matching pink sink and pink wall mounted toilet. My tile is pink, with white in the tub with a pink diamond pattern. I would have the tub reglazed to white as well as any pink tiles. A new white vanity and your favorite accessories to pull everything together.

We feel as if we’re living in the lap of luxury!

My challenge is trying to make those colors work with my colonial decor.

Cleaning Marble Hair Spray Build Up by countertopspecialty.com

The etching eats at the marble destroying the shiny polished layer leaving dull and sometimes discolored spots. Severe etching is not at all common, so the etch remover usually gets the job done quickly and easily and is far cheaper than a pro, but want you to know you may have to hire a pro if the job is beyond the capabilities of the polishing paste. It’s possible that your hair spray has etched the marble floor (it is full of chemicals that could react with marble and destroy the shine). The hair spray will still etch the marble, but you won’t notice it so much. The polish comes from intense grinding and sanding using machines or hand tools.

You can keep the polish nice with proper daily/weekly care, but acidic (and many alkaline) food, sprays, potions and lotions will corrode or “etch” marble destroying the polish. Acetone will not damage your marble, but it will remove anything on the surface.But the acetone will leave no question about cleaning marble of anything on the surface. However, if the countertop is large and/or the etching (corrosion that caused the marble to be dull) is severe, then you’ll need to hire a marble restoration professional to resurface the marble.

You will most likely need a professional to re-polish the surface in such circumstance (if the etching is severe). Granite does not etch, but marble, travertine, limestone and slate are all sensitive to acids. So, it’s not a matter of “cleaning marble” since your regular cleaning has likely removed hair spray residue. If the marble bathroom vanity is now rough to the touch, then this has been going on for quite a while. However, when the etching is severe (rough to touch) it can require hiring a marble repair professional to restore the countertop.

You may consider having the marble honed, which is a matte/satin type finish. Whatever you decide, it’s important to understand that you cannot polish marble or any stone with a spray or chemical. I have a feeling that what you think is old hairspray coating the marble is really just dull marble, because really hot water should remove hairspray. Once you do get the results you want, then be sure to use only products safe for marble to protect and clean it in the future. Etching occurs upon contact with an acidic substance and also from use of too harsh cleaning products.

Spartan Epoxies by spartanepoxies.com

We’re thinking about displaying actual powders instead of swatches that we have now. Premium quality epoxy for countertops, garage floors and more.

Our mission is to educate you on how to apply our products, inspire you to be creative, and enable you to execute your training and creativity to the highest level possible. The epoxies you buy are the same epoxies used in an industrial/commercial application. How difficult is epoxy to put down on my countertop, floor, garage floor, etc?

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