The natural stain matches the hardwood flooring throughout the first floor. Wall sconces on the foyer-side of the fireplace are used to balance the “off-center” wood mantel. The stained wood is an elegant feature, drawing your eye towards the fireplace in this large two story living room.

The fireplace is see-through between the formal dining room and great room. Wall sconces frame the wall above the mantel, which rises into the two story ceiling.

3 Ways To Clean A Limestone Fireplace by wikihow.com

Then wipe down your fireplace with a soft cloth dipped in a soapy solution. Apply the paste to the stains, let it set, and then remove it with a soft-edged scraper. The towels will protect your floors by catching any dirt, dust, soap, and grime during the cleaning process. Make sure to remove the spinning brush attachment or turn it off to avoid scratching the limestone. Do this if you do not have a handheld vacuum, or if the spinning brush cannot be removed from your vacuum. Wipe your fireplace until all of the loose dirt and debris are removed.

Alternatively, you can use a soft sponge, like the sponges used to wash cars, to clean the limestone. After the solution has finished setting, dip your cloth in the solution and wipe down your fireplace again. You may use a very soft bristle brush or toothbrush to remove stubborn dirt, as well as dirt from small crevices. Then wipe your fireplace from the top down until all the soap, dirt, and debris are removed. Wipe your fireplace down with the clean cloth until it is completely dry. Mix in small amounts of hydrogen peroxide little by little until a thick paste forms. The paste, also referred to as a poultice, will pull the stain out of your limestone. You can use a baby gate or another type of barrier to prevent children and pets from getting near the fireplace while the poultice is setting. Let the limestone air dry, or wipe it down with a dry microfiber cloth. Just remember to turn off the spinning brush, or remove it if it is an attachment, to avoid scratching the limestone.

First, remove loose dirt and debris from your fireplace using a vacuum or a dry, microfiber cloth.

To remove stains, make a homemade poultice by mixing flour with hydrogen peroxide until a thick paste forms. Additionally, make sure to remove any objects from your fireplace mantle. Use a handheld vacuum or attachment to remove loose dirt and debris from the limestone surrounding your fireplace.

Starting from the top of the fireplace, wipe it down using the microfiber cloth. Loose dirt and debris can scratch your fireplace if it is not removed prior to the cleaning process. Mix two to three tablespoons (15 to 45 ml) of a mild soap or detergent into the water. Alternatively, you can purchase a specially formulated limestone cleaner from your local hardware store to clean your limestone fireplace. Dip a clean microfiber cloth into the water, and squeeze out any excess water. Make sure to rewet your cloth in between wipes for a thorough clean. Alternatively, you can purchase a commercial poultice from your local hardware store to remove the stains.

It may take one to two days for the poultice to completely dry. You can find soft-edged scrapers at your local hardware store. Alternatively, you can use the vacuum to remove any remaining pieces of poultice from your limestone.

How To Update A Fireplace by thisoldhouse.com

Unlike a gas fireplace, which can be switched off, the only way to leave a wood fire is closed off with glass doors. The doors come in standard sizes that fit in any flat firebox opening. So before wood-burning season starts, examine the condition of the mortar in the firebox and take an hour or two to replace any that has deteriorated. That’s why so many of them still grace the parlors, dining rooms, and bedrooms of old houses even when the fireboxes have been walled over to eliminate drafts. Luckily, many discarded mantels have ended up at architectural salvage yards. It’s the hearth that’s always been there, an ornate buffer between the fire and the shag rug. You can change the whole look of a fireplace—and the room—in one or two weekends.

The only limitation is that they must be able to stand the heat (and a dropped log every now and then). But before you go at old bricks with a paint roller and some white semigloss, consider the more elegant cover-up of art tiles. You can replace an old quarry-tile hearth and cover a brick surround with four sleek granite slabs, each 1¼ inches think. It lacked a mantel, and hiring a carpenter to custom-build one was beyond the couple’s budget. I assume that a little is removed every time new grass is harvested.

Retrofitting this safety feature to an existing fireplace isn’t difficult.

Gaping mortar joints are not only unattractive, they leave the bricks more vulnerable to damage. A mantel serves not only as an architectural anchor in a room but as a functional shelf on which to display prized possessions. For every surviving example, of course, there are dozens that were torn from walls during reckless remodels. Now you’re more about dinner parties and family holidays in front of the hearth.

Rough brick can pull a rustic space together, while smooth glass can be used to set a modern tone. Use them as an accent with plain subway tile, or mix a handful in with monochromatic squares to make your fireplace surrounds spring to life. Today’s cast-stone veneer looks a lot like the real thing, with styles ranging from stacked stone to river rock. Replacing a hearth and surround—either with seamless tone slabs or with ceramic or stone tiles—makes a big difference in the way a fireplace looks. Unfortunately, fireplaces are also major air gaps—they can send up to 8 percent of valuable furnace-heated air flying out the chimney, making them really fun to look at but inefficient as heating sources.

Retrofitting this safety feature to an existing fireplace isn’t difficult. Gaping mortar joints are not only unattractive, they leave the bricks more vulnerable to damage. A mantel serves not only as an architectural anchor in a room but as a functional shelf on which to display prized possessions. For every surviving example, of course, there are dozens that were torn from walls during reckless remodels. Now you’re more about dinner parties and family holidays in front of the hearth. Rough brick can pull a rustic space together, while smooth glass can be used to set a modern tone.

Use them as an accent with plain subway tile, or mix a handful in with monochromatic squares to make your fireplace surrounds spring to life. Today’s cast-stone veneer looks a lot like the real thing, with styles ranging from stacked stone to river rock. The trick is to create a fireplace that is art without a flame. Unfortunately, fireplaces are also major air gaps—they can send up to 8 percent of valuable furnace-heated air flying out the chimney, making them really fun to look at but inefficient as heating sources. Learn how the homeowners doctored up the existing mantel with this rustic new mantelshelf. It was mentioned that that farm has up to three feet of loam soil.

Unlike a gas fireplace, which can be switched off, the only way to leave a wood fire is closed off with glass doors.

The doors come in standard sizes that fit in any flat firebox opening. So before wood-burning season starts, examine the condition of the mortar in the firebox and take an hour or two to replace any that has deteriorated.

That’s why so many of them still grace the parlors, dining rooms, and bedrooms of old houses even when the fireboxes have been walled over to eliminate drafts.

Luckily, many discarded mantels have ended up at architectural salvage yards. It’s the hearth that’s always been there, an ornate buffer between the fire and the shag rug. You can change the whole look of a fireplace—and the room—in one or two weekends. The only limitation is that they must be able to stand the heat (and a dropped log every now and then). But before you go at old bricks with a paint roller and some white semigloss, consider the more elegant cover-up of art tiles. You can replace an old quarry-tile hearth and cover a brick surround with four sleek granite slabs, each 1¼ inches think.

How To Clean A Marble Fireplace Surround by doityourself.com

Here are the basics of how to effectively clean a marble fireplace surround. For your regular cleaning, you might try using just water and a rag to clean it. Make sure to wipe down the marble when you are done to help avoid any streaks. This should remove any dirt or soil that is on the marble effectively.

However, you might find that it is difficult to keep the fireplace surround clean.

You should be able to apply it with a rag and then wipe it off.

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